More Deaths by Traffic Accidents Than Homicides in 2023: LAPD Chief

More Deaths by Traffic Accidents Than Homicides in 2023: LAPD Chief

Police cars block traffic at a crime scene in a file photo in Los Angeles. (Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images)

Micaela Ricaforte

Micaela Ricaforte

1/11/2024

Updated: 1/16/2024

The Los Angeles Police Department recorded more deaths by traffic accident than by murders last year, according to Chief Michel Moore.
“[In] 2023, [we] saw increases, year over year, and from years earlier, from traffic fatalities, particularly fatal hit and runs and fatal pedestrian and bicycle collisions,” Mr. Moore said Jan. 9.
Additionally, he said speeding and distractions were often the cause of the fatal accidents.
Data from the department shows that there were 330 fatal traffic accidents in Los Angeles in 2023, while the number of murders trailed close behind at 327.
Recent traffic fatalities include a crash on New Year’s Eve that killed a mother and father and their five-year-old daughter by a driver who was allegedly fleeing the scene of another hit-and-run.
Additionally, a 26-year-old man was killed Dec.8 when he was struck by an LAPD officer driving at high speed.
The officer was placed on administrative leave and could face a criminal charge, according to officials.
Meanwhile, Los Angeles saw a 15.4 percent decrease in its homicide rate from 2022, with murders falling from 382 to 323.
The city also saw a 3.2 percent decrease in violent crime, including a reduction in those involving homeless victims.
“We’ve seen cleaner streets, but also safer communities, as we see a double-digit reduction in crime involving homeless individuals, and 36 fewer homicide victims,” Chief Moore said.
The previous year, 92 homeless individuals were killed in Los Angeles, accounting for 24 percent of the city’s 381 homicide victims.
In 2023, 56 homeless individuals were killed, representing 17 percent of Los Angeles’ 327 homicide victims.
However, the city also saw several increased rates of crime in 2023, including a 3.5 percent increase in property crime and a 16 percent increase in retail theft.
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Micaela Ricaforte

Micaela Ricaforte

Author

Micaela Ricaforte covers education in Southern California for The Epoch Times. In addition to writing, she is passionate about music, books, and coffee.

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