California Farm Recalls Fruit after Potential Contamination Found

California Farm Recalls Fruit after Potential Contamination Found

A customer shops for nectarines at a farmers market in San Francisco on June 13, 2012. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Jill McLaughlin

Jill McLaughlin

11/21/2023

Updated: 12/30/2023

A California farm has recalled peaches, plums, and nectarines in several states after nearly a dozen people became sick from eating the fruit, the Food and Drug Administration announced Nov. 17.
HMC Farms, located in Kingsburg, California, about 90 miles north of Bakersfield, has voluntarily recalled its fruit sold in retail stores between May 1 and Nov. 15 in both 2022 and 2023, after the peaches were linked to an outbreak of Listeriosis in 11 people.
The fruit, which was sold in bags branded “HMC Farms” or “Signature Farms” with a “6359” sticker and may have been frozen by consumers, is being recalled because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism linked to serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.
“Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women,” the FDA said in its Nov. 17 announcement.
According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), people who are pregnant and come into contact with Listeria can have a fever, muscle aches, and tiredness. Those who are not pregnant and are exposed to the organism also may get a headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, or seizures.
The symptoms usually start within two weeks after eating food contaminated with Listeria, but can start as early as the same day or as late as 10 weeks after, the CDC reported.
The fruit was distributed nationwide and sold at retail stores as individual pieces or in bags. The recall includes only conventionally grown fruit, not organic fruit, according to the FDA.
Peaches, plums, and nectarines currently on sale at retail stores under the farm’s labels are not included in the recall.
Although the recalled fruit is no longer available in retail stores, consumers may have frozen it at home for later use. They are encouraged to check their freezers for the recalled fruit and to discard it.
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Jill McLaughlin

Jill McLaughlin

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Jill McLaughlin is an award-winning journalist covering politics, environment, and statewide issues. She has been a reporter and editor for newspapers in Oregon, Nevada, and New Mexico. Jill was born in Yosemite National Park and enjoys the majestic outdoors, traveling, golfing, and hiking.

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