Measure HLA Approved by Los Angeles Voters

Measure HLA Approved by Los Angeles Voters

People drive cars on a freeway in Los Angeles, Calif., on Feb. 2, 2024. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

Rudy Blalock

Rudy Blalock

3/5/2024

Updated: 3/11/2024

Measure HLA, which seeks to make Los Angeles streets more accessible and safer, is currently winning in early March 5 primary results.
According to the Los Angeles County registrar, the measure has over 64.7 percent of the vote approving to about 35.3 percent against, as of March 11.
It needs a majority of voters approving the measure to pass.
Updates as of 4:31 p.m., March 6. (Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk/Screenshot via California Insider)

Updates as of 4:31 p.m., March 6. (Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk/Screenshot via California Insider)

Measure HLA would implement the city’s 2015 approved Mobility Plan 2035 to upgrade more than 2,500 miles of city streets, of which only 5 percent has been completed, according to its sponsors.
The plan will ensure “the city finishes its plan for thousands of miles of safer streets in LA,” said supporters, by requiring the city to build bike and bus lanes, widen sidewalks, add crosswalks and other safety features—making streets more accessible to pedestrians and public transit—each time it repaves streets.
The measure would accelerate the plan’s completion within 5 to 15 years, instead of an estimated 160 years at the city’s current pace, according to sponsors.
“Each resurfacing requires LADOT to re-stripe the street afterwards—an opportunity to implement the Mobility Plan at minimal cost,” stated the campaign in support of the measure.
Opponents of the measure argue it will slow down emergency response times, increase traffic, and cost the city significantly over the next ten years.
A report last month by the Los Angeles City Administrative Office indicated the measure could cost $3.1 billion over 10 years, with two-thirds going to fund the repair of nearly 100 miles of sidewalk.
But sponsors of the measure say no such sidewalk repair is required in the city’s Mobility Plan and accused the City Administrative Office of “playing politics,” in a statement on the campaign’s website.
The campaign also argued bike lane costs were exaggerated and four times higher than what the city has spent on recent improvements.
“Measure HLA will not cause a significant impact on the City’s general fund, and would be an affordable program to fix our dangerous streets and save lives,” it said.
Based on their own calculations, sponsors estimate the measure will cost about $286 million through 2035.
Copy
facebooktwitterlinkedintelegram
Rudy Blalock

Rudy Blalock

Author

Rudy Blalock is a Southern California-based daily news reporter for The Epoch Times. Originally from Michigan, he moved to California in 2017, and the sunshine and ocean have kept him here since. In his free time, he may be found underwater scuba diving, on top of a mountain hiking or snowboarding—or at home meditating, which helps fuel his active lifestyle.

Author's Selected Articles
California Insider
Sign up here for our email newsletter!
©2024 California Insider All Rights Reserved. California Insider is a part of Epoch Media Group.