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Heat Wave to Hit Southern California Through Wednesday

Heat Wave to Hit Southern California Through Wednesday

Beachgoers cool off in the ocean at Seal Beach, Calif., during a heat wave on Sept. 6, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

Carol Cassis

Carol Cassis

8/28/2023

Updated: 9/6/2023

The National Weather Service in California has issued a heat advisory for Southern California residents from Aug. 28 through Aug. 30, after which temperatures are expected to cool down.
All Southern California counties will experience temperatures ranging from the mid-90s, all the way up to 118 degrees in southern desert regions like the Coachella Valley and Palm Springs, according to San Diego-based National Weather Service Meteorologist Brandt Maxwell.
The region’s coastline, like Newport Beach, will be in the high 80s while inland areas of Orange County are expected to reach temperatures from the mid-90s to 100 degrees.
The Los Angeles area is also under an excessive heat warning, which the national weather service identifies as “more deadly” with increased risk of death from sun stroke.
Inland areas including Van Nuys, Burbank, and Covina are estimated to reach temperatures from 100 to 108 degrees, during the first part of the week. Other areas under excessive heat warning include Woodland Hills and the San Fernando Valley.
Meteorologists say such temperatures are on par with average Southern California temps for this time of year.
“[The heat advisory and excessive heat warning] does happen pretty much every summer at this point as far as Southern California goes. It’s normal for this time of year,” Mr. Maxwell told The Epoch Times.
To cope with elevated temperatures, residents are urged to limit unnecessary sun exposure; wear breathable, light-colored clothing to deflect heat and sunscreen; and drink water during outdoor activities. The most important thing Mr. Maxwell said, is that residents often forget to not leave young children or pets alone inside vehicles.
According to Mr. Maxwell, a “notable cooling trend” will spread across the Southern California region by Wednesday at 8:00 p.m., after which temps are expected to decrease by five to 10 degrees.
Following tropical storm Hilary last week, the weather service reports there are no other detectable such storms to hit California any time soon, however El Niño storms are “potentially” in the cards sometime later this year, though reports indicate such storms would be relegated largely to Mexico.
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Carol Cassis

Carol Cassis

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California Insider
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