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Orange County Projects Awarded Nearly $3.4 Million to Keep Trash From Reaching the Ocean

Orange County Projects Awarded Nearly $3.4 Million to Keep Trash From Reaching the Ocean

High contamination levels in water caused temporary closures of Doheny Beach in Dana Point, Calif., on March 16, 2023. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

Julianne Foster

Julianne Foster

8/26/2023

Updated: 8/26/2023

Ten projects across Orange County have received nearly $3.4 million from the Orange County Transportation Authority, according to an Aug. 17 announcement by the transit authority, which will be used to improve beach water quality.
The funding will be used for ongoing environmental projects aimed at preventing waste from the county and nine cities from reaching the ocean by cleaning up litter and debris from roadways, according to the authority’s announcement.
“While Orange County Transit Authority is focused on improving transportation to keep the people of Orange County moving safely and efficiently, these water-quality projects also show how we can take the lead on protecting our natural resources in the process,” Gene Hernandez, chairman of the transportation authority and the mayor of Yorba Linda, said in the statement. “I’m proud of OCTA’s commitment to both goals.”
The projects will use the funding to purchase or upgrade screens, filters, and inserts in storm drains to prevent waste from washing into waterways, according to the statement.
The funding is thanks to the county voter-approved Measure M, which collects a half-cent sales tax to fund transportation improvements—including storm drain installments and repairs.
High contamination levels in water caused temporary closures of Doheny Beach in Dana Point, Calif., on March 16, 2023. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

High contamination levels in water caused temporary closures of Doheny Beach in Dana Point, Calif., on March 16, 2023. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

The county of Orange and cities of Anaheim, Costa Mesa, and Huntington Beach all received $500,000; Orange, $436,000; San Clemente, $328,000; Laguna Hills, $200,000; Mission Viejo, $180,000; La Habra, $174,000; and Newport Beach, $56,000.
The transit authority determined the funding amounts based on whether each city’s project is ready to begin and cost-effective, and how significant the work will be for the region.
Since Measure M was implemented in 2011, according to the transit authority, it has already used over $36 million for 222 projects aimed at managing waste washing from roadways into drains and has captured approximately 60 million gallons of trash through storm drains.
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Julianne Foster

Julianne Foster

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California Insider
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