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Orange County Vector Control Sprays to Prevent Spread of Mosquito-Borne Disease

Orange County Vector Control Sprays to Prevent Spread of Mosquito-Borne Disease

A Contra Costa County mosquito and vector control district technician sprays BVA Larvacide Oil into standing water in a catch basin in Pleasant Hill, Calif., on June 29, 2012. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Julianne Foster

Julianne Foster

9/11/2023

Updated: 9/11/2023

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Fullerton, California, residents received relief from mosquitos after the Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District conducted sprays last week for three days to reduce the risk of a mosquito-borne disease, according to city officials.
The abatement comes a little over two months after the county’s vector control agency announced West Nile Virus-positive mosquitoes had been discovered in Fullerton on July 27, near Rosecrans Avenue and N. Filbert Street.
The virus—which normally circulates in the summer—can be transmitted through mosquito bites. Approximately 20 percent of those infected will feel a variety of symptoms, including a fever, headache, body aches, nausea, tiredness, and possibly a skin rash, according to the Orange County Health Agency.
“Fullerton is historically a high-risk area for West Nile virus activity,” Amber Semrow, director of scientific and technical services said in a vector control press release the day announcing the discovery in the city. “Conditions across the region are favorable for sustained virus activity during the warm summer months.”
According to an Aug. 28 press release from the county health agency, one person has been reported infected by the virus this year in Orange County. Los Angeles health officials additionally have identified 19 human cases of the virus in that county, with one death from the virus as of Sept. 7.
Mosquitos are seen inside a trap in Pleasant Hill, Calif., on June 29, 2012. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Mosquitos are seen inside a trap in Pleasant Hill, Calif., on June 29, 2012. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Vector control will conduct further surveillance in the coming weeks and apply additional control sprays based on findings.
The office has assured the spray used will not hurt people, pets, fruit trees, vegetable gardens, or fishponds and air conditioning systems will not need to be turned off during the application.
To further avoid contracting the virus, the agency encourages residents to empty standing water on their property where mosquitos may breed—such as near flowerpots and pet bowls—ensure window and door screens are in good condition, limit activity outside after dawn, wear long-sleeved shirts and pants when outdoors, and use insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or products containing IR3535—a biodegradable insect repellent.
Last year, the Orange County health agency reported 11 people were infected in the county—two of whom died.
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Julianne Foster

Julianne Foster

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